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DISCOVER THE LEGACY OF THE WAR IN WALES

1914

1918

 

First World War Sites in north west Wales

 

 

Cymraeg

Food Production

In spring and summer 1917 the naval blockade of Britain by the Germans was at its height and many ships were lost with their cargo, much of it imported food. Food production from British farms had also decreased since the start of the War due to the loss of labourers to war and to factories and to the loss of horse power as horses were requisitioned for war. This led to a crisis in the food supply with Britain close to running out of food.

To increase labour on farms the Women's Land Army was created in 1917 but although useful propaganda relatively few women joined, mostly urban girls with little experience. Most of the women working on the land were rural women who had always worked on the land and were organised by the Women's Food Production League or the Women's War Agricultural Committee. Labour was also provided by the Labour Corps of soldiers injured in the war and unfit for fighting but capable of farm work, as well as German prisoners of war.

In spring 1917 there was a campaign to increase the number of allotments cultivated and to grow vegetables in gardens, publicised by vegetables being grown in the garden on No10 by Lloyd George and on gardens in front of Buckingham Palace. Schools and hospitals were encouraged to grow their own vegetables. School children also collected blackberries and other fruit for jams and horse chestnuts to use in industrial processes instead of grain.

 

 

 

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