Prehistoric Funerary and Ritual Monument Survey
West Gwynedd, Anglesey 2002-2003
The main part of the work on the Funerary and Ritual Survey in north-west Wales was completed in March 2003 after three years of survey and completion of reports on each years work and completion of a summary publication report on the project work in Meirionnydd, published in the Journal of the Merioneth Record and Historical Society XIV 2003. In 2003-4 it remained to produce summary publication reports on the work in Anglesey and Caernarvonshire. It had also been agreed that there would be palaeo-environmental study by Astrid Caseldine of one select area in each of the Welsh Archaeological Trusts and this would require some archaeological liaison and field visits, as required.

Regional Publication Synthesis
The summary publication report for Anglesey was submitted and accepted in principle by the editor of the Transactions of the Anglesey Antiquarian Society, Professor Tony Carr. The report and illustrations were edited after comments by Frances Lynch and was then submitted for approval by Sian Rees. The final report and illustrations were then submitted to the editor and are now in press and will appear in the 2004 volume.

The summary publication report for the survey in West Conwy and Gwynedd was also submitted and accepted in principle by Mr H.G. Williams, the editor of the Transactions of the Caernarvon Historical Society. The report was modified after comments by Frances Lynch and submitted to Sian Rees for approval. The report and illustrations were then submitted to the editor and are now in press and will appear in the 2004 volume.

Palaeo-environmental study
The palaeo-environmental program was continued with visits to Waun Llanfair and Bwlch y Ddeufaen, Conwy and Cregennan, Meirionnydd. Astrid Caseldine took two columns in the basin at Waun Llanfair and these have been assessed for potential. A full report on this assessment will be submitted by Astrid Caseldine. The deposits, up to a metre deep were found to be of humic silt rather than peat but still retained enough pollen for analysis. Charcoal was found at the base of the deposits and preliminary dating shows that the deposits span the period approximately between the Later Mesolithic and the Middle Bronze Age, thus providing potentially very useful information on the environment at the time when the funerary and ritual monuments were being built in this area, including the well-known Druid’s Circle stone circle, kerb cairns, cairns with cists and cairn fields of smaller cairns.

George Smith